Inside 3D Printing Conference & Expo - Melbourne - Day 1 - Tuesday, May  9th, 2017

8:30 am
Registration
9:30 am
The Session Description will be available shortly.
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Speaker
Garrison Zong
Chairman and CEO
3DP Technology Inc
10:15 am
There are major disruptions in the film industry around the world as 3D printing impacts on traditional production practices. From props, to costume, to stop-motion animation, to set construction, 3D printing is not just supplementing the capabilities of conventional special effects practices but causing studios to radically rethink their operations and output. This presentation looks at cutting edge practices and professional development for the film industry in 3D printing and associated digital technologies and identifies their challenges and opportunities for the Australian Film Industry
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Speaker
Jennifer Loy
Professor of Integrated Product Design
University of Technology Sydney
11:00 am
Exhibits & Morning Break
11:30 am
The introduction of 3D printing processes that can vary colour, transparency and hardness during a single process (Stratasys j750) opens up new opportunities to create and animate life like dynamic (4D) creatures for the film industry.
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Speaker
Ross Stevens
Senior Lecturer - Industrial Design
Victoria University of Wellington
12:00 pm
Hewlett Packard has been a long-time leader in the IT sector for more than 60 years and Silicon Valley’s first garage-to-world leader story. The keynote will focus on how HP, through its heritage of technological breakthroughs in Inkjet printing technology and its technological assets, will break the industries barriers and revolutionize the additive manufacturing/3D Printing industry. This presentation will reveal Hewlett Packard’s roadmap to this transformation through its HP Multi Jet Fusion TM technology and its go-to-market vision.
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Speaker
Marc Torras
Go-To-Market Senior Manager
3D Printing HP Inc. Asia Pacific and Japan
12:30 pm
Lunch Break
1:30 pm
The SLM technology has been established in the market for more than ten years now in professional applications. Meanwhile, big companies have started to implement this technology into every day production. This presentation will describe this implementation in detail and highlight the advantages of future manufacturing opportunities. A focus will be given on the acceleration of production speed by latest multilaser setup as well as an outlook into implementation of this technology into full production cycles will be given.
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Speaker
Stefan Ritt
VP-Head of global marketing and communications
SLM Solutions GmbH
2:00 pm
With significant experience delivering medical advancements through technology, Piers provides unique insight on how organisations can better incorporate Additive Manufacturing, form stronger institutional and industry partnerships to generate greater value and greater impact in the community.
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Speaker
Piers Lincoln
Institute Manager of IPAS
University of Adelaide
2:30 pm
There are many challenges that industries are facing in industrializing AM; from ideas to applications to machines to software. Kelvin will share the journey of Materialise in AM in the last 27 years, how other companies have been successful in really going into manufacturing, and the importance of having a solid backbone and complete ecosystem.
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Speaker
Kelvin WeeMaterialise Korea
APAC Sales Manager
Materialise
3:00 pm
Additive fabrication has over the last ten years had a profound impact on materials research, opening new pathways to construct novel structures and enable the undertaking of fundamental research. In this exciting time it has become necessary to tune to operating parameters of printers to enable novel materials to be processed. Often, this is not possible, leading to the need for new hardware to be envisaged, developed and tested. The greatest examples of this need have been seen in the bio-additive fabrication space, where the sensitivities of the carrier materials, bio-factors, and live cells, as well as the working environment, have required the development of new means of producing multiple material structures over micro to macro length scales. The presented body of work will focus on the integrated design approach that has been employed in the realisation of functional prototype platforms, including the Biopen for use in cartilage regeneration clinical trials. Individually these platforms enable the development of new structures with target materials. However, the clinically informed need points to a requirement of systems integration combining hard and soft materials with feature resolutions through the range of sub-micron through to 100 micron in size.
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Speaker
Stephen Beirne
Senior Research Fellow
University of Wollongong
3:30 pm
Exhibits & Afternoon Break
4:00 pm
Leon will discuss how CSIRO are assisting the use of AM in hi-tech, high added-value sectors with their non-destructive testing techniques.
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4:30 pm
Discussion panel:
The Session Description will be available shortly.
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Speakers
Martin Leary
Assoc Professor, School Of Engineering
Jennifer Loy
Professor of Integrated Product Design
University of Technology Sydney
Lars Neumann
Industry and Application Manager Additive Manufacturing
TRUMPF
Stefan Ritt
VP-Head of global marketing and communications
SLM Solutions GmbH
5:30 pm
End of First Conference Day

Inside 3D Printing Conference & Expo - Melbourne - Day 2 - Wednesday, May 10th, 2017

8:30 am
Registration
9:30 am
The disruptive nature of AM now enables ‘surgeon specific’ and ‘patient specific’ solutions to be delivered in hospitals by point of use manufacturing. Traditional manufacturing systems are inefficient and require the importation of medical devices from large scale ‘off shore’ manufacturers. High volume, factory based manufacturing of ‘off the shelf ’ devices require complex supply chain logistics that have consistently increased costs. Environmental costs incurred by air and road couriers, packaging, waste and sterilization are also substantial. As no two people are the same the limited number of sizes of the ‘off the shelf’ prosthetics do not suit everybody. Outdated regulatory frameworks, quality systems and reimbursement requirements for ‘off the shelf’ devices have become dysfunctional and expensive. These regulations do not apply to surgeon and patient specific solutions. A research initiative to investigate the utility of AM technology in a contemporary hospital networks over a three years has commenced. The collaborative project involves Anatomics, the CSIRO, universities and several clinical sites. Community based personalised healthcare is a new way of thinking about healthcare. It unlocks the potential of surgeons to engage with advanced manufacturing to innovate and create both ‘surgeon specific’ and ‘patient specific’ therapeutic solutions. Anatomics seeks to provide architecture to schools, hospitals and universities that enables sharing and creativity. Point of use, distributed manufacturing improves efficiency, reduces waste, and creates sustainable value based outcomes. Patients, government, and insurers will benefit from a cost effective and sustainable healthcare solution that is affordable and available to all people.
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Speaker
Paul D’Urso
Neurosurgeon & Founder
Anatomics
10:15 am
3D printing is currently receiving considerable attention for medical applications owing to its potential for rapid product development and the growing number of demonstrations by which the various technologies are being applied to create working devices to improve patient outcomes. The growing acceptance of the technology for medical applications is illustrated by the American FDA authorising 3D printed cranial implants for sale within the US market as a standard medical device, in addition to several global insurance companies recognising and investing in the use of 3D printed for rehabilitation applications. As such the medical additive manufacturing market is forecast for net growth of 25% annually, increasing its value to $2.13 billion USD by 2020, but is likely to greatly exceed these expectations given the current momentum of developments. We are currently at an exciting juncture where the convergence of medical and 3D printing technologies are set to disrupt and positively transform all sectors of healthcare ranging across teaching/training, pre-clinical planning, surgical intervention, post-surgical solutions and rehabilitation strategies. This presentation will review the current impact 3D printing has make on the healthcare sector and highlight future scope and opportunities in this space.
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Speaker
Mazher Iqbal Mohammed
Research Fellow in Advance Design
Deakin University’s School of Engineering
11:00 am
Exhibits & Morning Break
11:30 am
The Prosthetics industry utilizes a broad mix of advanced technology and traditional bespoke manufacturing methods. The experience of the Form Prosthetics team in entering that market with custom 3D printed products has given insight and learning around adoption of 3D print and CAD technologies for use as end use products & for new processes. The experience has shown that in appropriate applications adopting 3D printed products for end use is suitable, commercially viable, and offers solutions otherwise unavailable. There are also however many challenges and further opportunities within the industry that can, and no doubt will, further develop over time. It is expected that as barriers such as material and machine time cost reduce further opportunities will become viable within the industry allowing for further creative and functional solutions.
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Speaker
Anthony Petterson
Managing Director
Form Prosthetics
12:00 pm
Gain insight into current list of qualified additive manufactured flight critical metal parts. Understand which parts are in the OEMs roadmap. Learn how industrial 3D Printers can be used to differentiate your future services to major OEMs, and assist in creating a sustainable competitive advantage. Learn the steps required to prepare your Additive Manufacturing facility for Operational and Performance Qualification with the aviation authority
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12:30 pm
Lunch Break
1:30 pm
3D Printing has opened up a world of possibilities when it comes to designing prototypes and functional parts. Not only are you limited to printing in PLA and ABS, but you are able to use more advance materials like carbon fibre, Nylon, PET, Polycarbonate, Flexible materials and even dissolvable support materials. Find out which material is is best suited for which designs. Explore some useful techniques from CURA, an open-source slicing software developed by Ultimaker, including learning how to create Meta-Materials, which are synthetic composite material with a structure such that it exhibits properties not usually found in natural materials.
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Speaker
Kae Woei LimImaginables
Creative Director
Imaginables
2:00 pm
Making is all about materialising creativity, making something real and tangible often from imagination, or perhaps building on and leveraging the creativity of other people's imagination. Makers that have access to digital fabrication tools such as 3D printing have an advantage over traditional making techniques, as it can also enable the maker to make things previously not possible or accessible. to that maker. For example, a relatively inexperienced maker can use simple 3D modelling tools to create jewellery, which can then be simply printed — perhaps in precious metals — even using a third-party printing service. While that maker may not be skilled as a professional jeweller, nor have the appropriate tools, this technology has effectively enabled makers. Makers can also collaborate in their creativity by sharing 3D models and pooling resources online. For many years, makers globally have been enriching the collective ecosystem for many years so that makers today need not start from first principles. Today, we explore what it is to be a ‘modern maker’, today using the digital tools available and contrasting this against what we previously categorised as “craft”, which is effectively the offline version of ‘making’, and has traditionally had a higher representation of female makers. What are the differences? We make the assertion that to some makers and crafters, the 3D printer is the sewing machine of the 21st century, and ask if the term “making” as we know it today is simply a masculine term given to what we once would have associated as craft. If consumer 3D printing technology is appropriately marketed, would we see an increase in female representation using this technology, as a technology that has already demonstrated its capability to enable its user’s creativity?
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Speaker
April Staines
Co-Founder
Girl Geek Academy
2:30 pm
The ability to print on consumer level printers is easy, downloading or buying a design off the internet for a gadget or widget is quite accessible. However, we are not seeing this manufacturing process entering into the mainstream product line up of consumer items as fast as once predicted. Part of the reason why this may be is that the design and engineering course of the last few years only had access to the lower end printers. Now with universities and companies having access to better machines and materials how are we as educators teaching students to design better products using this technology. This discussion will go from the student perspective, discussing the need for all professional to have an understanding of the design process then contrasting how industries are adopting the technology.
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Speaker
Paul Collins
Senior Lecturer
Deakin University
3:00 pm
This presentation will discuss how high-end 3D Printing from Stratasys, with the assistance from Fuji-Xerox, can be used to help service Australian needs in this time of change in the local industrial landscape.
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3:30 pm
Exhibits & Afternoon Break
4:00 pm
3D printing brings many benefits that traditional methods of manufacturing or prototyping simply cannot. New applications of 3D printing are emerging almost daily. This presentation will show you how 3D Printing Technology can help you Manufacture the Future Now and accelerate your design-to-manufacturing workflow. From initial concept design to final manufacturing, 3D printing spans the entire creation process and all steps in between
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Speaker
Matt MinioObjective3D
Managing Director
Objective3D
4:30 pm
Discussion panel:
The Session Description will be available shortly.
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Moderator
Ian Gibson
Professor of Industrial Design
Deakin University
Speakers
Kae Woei LimImaginables
Creative Director
Imaginables
April Staines
Co-Founder
Girl Geek Academy
5:00 pm
End of Inside 3D Printing Melbourne 2017
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